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Meant to Be. Women's Club 2. Lesbian Pussy Worship. But if money derives from functions of state, and not from the natural conditions of markets, then the State has ontological priority. By studying the stars according to Aristotle , he determined that there was to be an exceptionally large olive harvest that year.

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The second insight into Thales's activities comes from the account of his work for King Alyattes of Lydia. A dreamer who goes around falling into wells does not sound like someone to hire for military engineering projects; but that is the account from Herodotus that we have of Thales, who is supposed to have actually diverted a river around behind the Lydian army so that it could avoid too deep a ford.

The war between the Medes and the Lydians, during which Thales accompanied the Lydian king, also provides us with the one solid date that we have for Thales's life. That is because the climactic battle between the Medes and Lydians, at which Thales would have been present, was stopped by a total eclipse of the sun.

The date of the eclipse can now be calculated precisely: The path of the eclipse can even be inspected using computer software on home computers. The eclipse, indeed, was later said to have been predicted by Thales. That is clearly impossible. To predict an eclipse, one must know what an eclipse is -- the moon getting in the way of the sun -- and no Greek knew that for some time to come; and one must have records of eclipses for some centuries to understand the relationship of the moon's orbit to the ecliptic the apparent path of the sun in the sky -- the Greeks had no such records perhaps until the Pythagoreans.

Although Thales could not have predicted the eclipse, it could have been predicted at the time -- by the Babylonians. Consequently, if the story about Thales was not made up out of whole cloth, the only explanation is that he heard , perhaps on his travels, that there was going to be an eclipse. The Babylonian priests were in the habit of publicly announcing astronomical events, as the priests in Jerusalem also announced things like the beginning of the month and occurrence of Passover; but, in the absence of newspapers, radio, wire services, CNN, etc.

If Thales heard of the prediction, and then reported it back home, it may not have been remembered that he merely reported, rather than originated, the story. The overall impression of Thales then is more of a man of affairs, sometimes very serious affairs e.

But if that was the case, why would the story about Thales and the olive presses have been told in the first place? Because, indeed, such disdain for money would be characteristic of later Greek philosophy. Where Socrates was simply unconcerned with the ordinary commercial life of Athens, while he flourished right in the middle of it, philosophers like Plato and Aristotle had become actively hostile to it and removed their own activities to closed schools outside the walls of Athens.

Only one great school of philosophy, Stoicism , remained in the marketplace, taking its name from the characteristic open-faced building, often called a "porch," a , stoa , that was to be found there, and in one of which Zeno of Citium established himself. Plato distrusted commerce, detested democracy, and also came to believe that teaching philosophy to just anyone was dangerous.

A tradition of ethical argument arose that questioned whether engaging in trade was even moral, since merchants did not produce their commodities and so did not contribute to their intrinsic value. Some philosophers, indeed, perceived that the value of products also depended on their location , so that trade was useful in moving things to where they were needed or wanted; but then someone like Plato was also distrustful of that service, since a lot of superfluous trade goods could engender "unnecessary desires" and distract people from their duties and more sober pursuits.

But as late as the 5th century, St. Augustine was still advising that trade was not a profession that could be practiced without moral harm. Comparing Athens and Sparta, a philosopher like Plato was unmistakably a Spartan sympathizer. Yet even he realized there was a problem: Plato realized that philosophy had no place there, and he was concerned lest the rulers in his ideal Republic exhibit those characteristics.

So Plato never tried to sell his thought at Sparta. He did entertain a hope, however, that if a tyrant could be "converted" to philosophy, then his ideas would be implemented. During one trip there, however, in , Plato so infuriated Dionysius, evidently, that he was sold into slavery and had to be redeemed by his friends and family. Naturally, he gave up on tyrants after that experience.

So, although Plato had no love for the democracy at Athens, he "voted with his feet," as they say, in its favor. The attitudes in Greek philosophy towards Athens and Sparta, as well as sympathies and actions comparable to those of Plato, can also be seen in the Twentieth Century.

Henry Kissinger , President Nixon's foreign policy adviser and later Secretary of State, is supposed to have remarked once, privately, that the United States was liable to lose the Cold War to the Soviet Union in the same way and for the same reasons that Athens lost the Peloponnesian War to Sparta. While America, presumably, was enervated by the political squabbling characteristic of democracy and by the crass materialism of capitalistic consumerism, the Soviet Union was lean, disciplined i.

Spartan , morally upright no pornography or gay rights demonstrations there , unified, and remorselessly purposful [ note ].

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At the same time, it was not uncommon in the United States for leftist academics and intellectuals to harbor much admiration for the Soviet Union, or later for Communist China, Cuba, Vietnam, or Nicaragua, despite widespread knowledge of the police state apparatus of those regimes, of the mass murders, slave labor camps, torture, brainwashing, false confessions, etc.

Nevertheless, like Plato, most sympathizers voted with their feet to stay in the United States [ note ]. Despite the Fall of Communism, much disdain for commercial democracy remains. As Greek philosophy never came to appreciate the social, political, and economic context in which it originated, grew, and thrived, many modern intellectuals continue to despise the very kind of society in which they are uniquely to be found -- uniquely in great measure because the kind of society they evidently want would actually not allow them to express their own opinions, or to subsidize such expression so lavishly, either at state expense e.

Ted Turner. So, although the Soviet Union is gone, like Sparta, and its vast experiment in common ownership and economic planning failed utterly, as well as being drenched in the blood of its victims, one would hardly know this listening to contemporary leftists and Marxists. The planning of a command economy still sounds like the wave of the future to them. Ironically, Marx himself may provide the best key to this phenomenon: Intellectuals may like the idea of command and control for a society and for an economy because they see themselves in control.

Not surprisingly, Plato thinks that the problem of politics is that the wrong people are in charge , and the rulers in his ideal Republic are people like him. Intellectuals have a "class interest" which means a self-interest -- for people who otherwise say they detest "self-interest" in promoting this idea. They see their own lofty achievements as entitling them to the rule of others -- a self-interest now described by the theory of rent-seeking.

In this way, the crypto-socialist economist John Kenneth Galbraith fulminated against advertising as producing, just as Plato would have said, "unnecessary desires. This kind of arrogance will soon probably produce the prohibition of tobacco, as it disastrously produced Prohibition of alcohol in the 20's.

But one of the clearest lessons of the Twentieth Century is that this self-serving fantasy of rule by Academia is the most bitter folly: Absolute power, once unleashed, slips from the hands of timid professors and is seized by ruthless monsters like Lenin, Hitler, Stalin, Castro, etc. The intellectuals get silenced, killed, or, almost worse, become fawning mouthpieces for tyranny.

Too many intellectuals were already mouthpieces for tyranny, even when they didn't need to be, as when the New York Times reporter, Walter Duranty, received a Pulitzer Prize for his reporting on Stalinist Russia, even while he was helping to suppress the truth about Stalin's terror famine in the Ukraine -- the starving to death of millions of peasants perhaps 5 million just because they had been too successful on their private farms.

Success made them class enemies, "Kulaks. Indeed, it is a distressing and sobering new truth of history, little suspected before our time, that a vast educated class may, by its very nature, be hostile to freedom, democracy, and the creation of wealth for everyone -- though China was similarly ill served by the scholar Mandarins.

The truth is not enough. As Thomas Jefferson said, "All know the influence of interest on the mind of man, and how unconsciously his judgment is warped by that influence. It should be no surprise to then see the educated promoting ignorance and the free promoting tyranny , all in the hope that power will fall to them. They will, indeed, derive no benefit should their ambitions be realized, but by then it will be too late for benefit to anyone else.

Ross, Ph. Why the Greeks? You are not Romans, but Lombards! While Liutprand wrote in Latin; this is not what Nicephorus spoke, and the Greek version here is a speculative back-translation from Latin to Greek. Liutprand, of course, was himself the Lombard, not the Saxon Otto; and Nicephorus was also infuriated that Liutprand carried a letter, not only presenting Otto as a "Roman," but that addressed Nicephorus himself as a "Greek.

The Romans, however, ended up with their own words. The names in English clearly derive from Latin, but it is not clear where the Latin words have come from. While Smyth says that this "is borrowed from Latin," it is not clear why Aristotle would know about a Latin word or have any reason to borrow it. Smyth says these were "the first Hellenes of whom the Romans had knowledge.

There is no telling how the Romans really latched onto this name. South or east of Greece, we find names that derive from , Ionia , where Greek philosophy began. In Egyptian, we find. The Egyptians normally didn't write vowels, but we have Demotic writings of this name with the group, which looks like it is used for the long vowel "i," especially when this often at the end of words, making adjectives, just as Arabic does with.

This is confirmed when we get a version later in Coptic , , Weinin , which fits the consonsants and that vowel [ note ]. And, far off in India, in Sanskrit "Greek" was Yavana ,. Yavanapura , , the "City of the Greeks," seems to have been the name for Alexandria , Egypt. Curiously, would later be used even for Muslims, after they invaded India in Ionic is one of the basic dialects of Greek, and the name is also associated with one of the canonical styles of architecture, the Ionic Order , which is more delicate than the Doric but still less elaborate than the Corinthian.

The consonant "h" had simply been lost in Ionic, as it is in Modern Greek. On the map we see the ten original cities of Ionia, plus Smyrna, an Aeolic city that later joined them. The names of early Greek philosophers can be associated with several of these cities. The Mediaeval Greeks were thus, to themselves and to others, Romans. Historians may mention this, but -- except for Anthony Kaldellis -- they never follow the usage and appear not to take it seriously -- Julius Caesar, now that's a Roman , not people like Justinian who codified Roman Law or Nicephorus Phocas see epigraph.

The Empire was itself Romania , in Latin, or , in Greek, names used since at least the 4th century but generally not mentioned by historians, not even Byzantinists except Kaldellis. Once there were German Emperors, beginning with Charlemagne , in the West, legitimized by the Pope , they began to think of themselves as "Romans" as in the Sanctum Imperium Romanum , the "Holy Roman Empire" and to dismiss the Emperors in Constantinople as "Greeks" or even insultingly as Graeculi , "Greeklings" or "Little Greeks" singular Graeculus.

When they felt like being more diplomatic, however, they might use a name transcribed from back into Latin, as Romaei singular Romaeus or Romei singular Romeus. The Emperor of the Romans could not really object to being called the Imperator Romaeorum. Yes, Romeo, as in Romeo and Juliet. Had Romeo been to Rome? Or had his name already become detached from this usage?

Because of the play, "Romeo" now usually means a kind of lover. Isaac Angelus , more insolently, styled Frederick the First 'chief prince of Alemannia. Such a distinction was available in Greek, with for the City and for the Empire. The real confusion here is in James Bryce, since there never was a "Thracian Province of Romania"; and Byrce, apparently ignorant of the Mediaeval meaning of "Romania," is thinking of his contemporary Turkish province of Rumelia , , as the descendant of "Romania.

Bryce seems to think that Frederick is insulting Issac by using "Romania" in the way that Isaac has used "Alemannia," when that would not have been the case. Note 1. Wallis Budge gives us two hieroglypic and two Coptic writings of "Greek. Faulker [], and Bill Petty [], do not have a word for "Greek," probably because it is from Late Egyptian.

The phonetic value of the "eye" glyph, , is with some kind of semi-vowel no one is quite sure what the value of the phoneme is and an "r. The first hieroglyphic writing ends with determinatives for "foreign" and "land. The Coptic writings both clarify and obscure matters. The first one, , is clear enough. The "ou" digraph, as with Greek or the French "ou" in the same position , is read as a "w.

Our last clue here is that the double "n" in the hieroglyphic writing does indeed mean a double "n," separated by the vowel "i. We have two extra vowels here. What is going on? If they meaning anything, it must mean that we have more than one vowel, with a separation by a glottal stop, glide, or something.

And the "eei" may have a diphthong value that originally had in Greek but then lost. The third "e," in turn, may suggest the role of the glottal stop in the second hieroglyphic writing. I am tempted to suggest a new, combined hieroglyphic writing, as ; but, really, the matter must remain obscure.

Note 2 Although widely distributed around the Mediterranean basin, Mediterranean climates are actually rather rare in the world. The most extensive area is the south coast of Australia. None of these places ended up with the other geographical and cultural attributes that put Greece and the Mediterranean in such historically important roles.

Return to text The Origin of Philosophy: Look good. Be your own boss. Don't get stuck behind a desk. Only take cash. We don't know how good Greek traders would have looked olive oil in the hair is not fashionable at the moment , but everything else certainly fits, and success did follow.

Beldar Conehead takes Sinbad's advice. He is self-employed as a driving instructor, where he is not behind a desk, and he only takes cash. It is not clear whether this is a legitimate, licensed business which pays taxes. Beldar's attempt at aquiring a stolden identity earlier in the movie has fallen through, and we see no attempt to duplicate its advantages.

Lichtheim argues rather awkwardly that the text is intended as a "satire" because the "scribal profession" never would have harbored "a contempt for manual labor so profound as to be unrelieved by humor. However, one does not have to have either contempt or respect to recognize that manual labor in an ancient society, with nothing in the way of modern medicine and when the average life-span was only about 35 years, was hard, merciless, and ravaging.

A text that begins "I have seen many beatings" must be expected to be offering a sober caution, if indeed there were "many beatings," which, as it happens, is undeniable. Why there is any particular dignity in getting beaten by tax collectors, or why a scribal writer would want to satirize it, is more than a little mysterious.

No, the concern for the dignity of labor here is modern and editorial, if not Marxist, and the intention of the author of the text is clearly the very serious recommendation of scribal life, attended with reading, writing, and authority, over the hard labor and social subordination of other professions.

Note 5 The origin of the word "Phoenician" is a matter of interest. Krahmalkov, Brill, Leiden, , p. Latin Poeni for Cathaginians and the adjective Punicus look like they come directly from the Phoenician words. Phoinix , , in Greek is the noun, "Phoenician. The word could be seen as having a Greek adjectival ending, -ik- , and we might think the way to analyze it is as coming from an adjective Phoin-ik-os.

But this will not do. Phoinix is a Third Declension noun, and we must analyze it as Phoinik-s , in the nominative, as it is Phoinik-os in the genitive. A Greek adjective of Phoinix is actually Phoinikikos , , where the adjectival ending -ik-os goes onto the root Phoinik-. And we already see po-ni-ke in Mycenaean Greek. We thus must account for the extra consonant in the root.

Phoinix may actually be a borrowing from Egyptian. The Fn portion of the root, of course, looks like it would correspond to the word in Phoenician, which may leave us wondering: If the Egyptian word was originally borrowed from Phoenician, where did the Egyptians get the third consonant? As it happens, Phoenician phonology originally had a consonant kh , which was subsequently lost [Krahmalkov, p.

It is possible that an earlier stage of the Phoenician language had that consonant in its root -- three consonsant roots are the norm in Semitic Languages -- which is where the Egyptians got it. It is also possible, of course, that the Greeks got to the Phoenicians early enough that they also got their third consonant directly from the Phoenician word; but since the consonant is not attested in written Phoenician, and the Egyptians were dealing with the Phoenicians two thousand years before the Greeks were when Phoenician was not written , they would have been in a better position to pick up long lost consonants.

While is puzzling for the extra consonant in the root, it is also used to mean "purple, purple-red, crimson," i. However, I don't understand the morphology of this alteration either. An infixed "i" may be part of some regular word formation, but I am unfamiliar with it. There are problems either way. The geographic backbone of Phoenicia, Mount Lebanon, had the same name then as now: Lebanon Lbnn -- rendered by the Egyptians as Rmnn ,.

This also became a Greek word for Egyptian papyrus , otherwise , probably traded by Byblos, and so, more commonly as biblos , a word for "book," or biblion ,. Indeed, no papyrus grew in Phoenicia, so the Greeks, at least initially, certainly knew about the material as it was provided by Phoenician traders. Later, the Greeks went to Egypt and could buy their own papyrus, but the words of Phoenician original persisted.

Note 7 The initial slope of the pyramid was not really too steep, at 54 o 27'44", even though the pyramid was finished at 43 o 22'. The angle of the Great Pyramid of Khufu would soon be 51 o 50'40"; and the pyramid of Khafre would have an angle of 53 o 10'. Instead the Bent Pyramid suffered from problems with the developing technology: It was this combination of a lack of good mortar, carelessly laid blocks, and, most importantly, the unstable desert surface, that caused the structural problems.

This was solved by flattening off the slope, resulting in the famous "bent" shape of the pyramid. Seneferu seems to have been displeased enough to order a complete new pyramid built, which was subsequently finished as the first true pyramid, the "Northern" pyramid at Dahshur. The photo of the upper chamber of the Bent Pyramid is from I.

Note 8 Fans of Star Trek may recognize the word "archon" from the classic Star Trek episode "The Return of the Archons," 22 in the original series, which aired February 9, The "archons" referred to were the crew of the starship Archon , which had been captured and the crew "absorbed" by the mind-controlling, totalitarian regime of a planet ruled by a computer impersonating an ancient legislator named "Landru" rather like Sparta's Lycurgus.

The episode ends with Captain Kirk in one of his classic moments arguing the computer into a nervous breakdown, freeing the planet. Although the individualistic message of this episode, as of much of the original Star Trek , is unmistakable, note later tendencies of the series, as discussed in " The Fascist Ideology of Star Trek.

Synesius of Balagrae c. Terzaghi, Synesii Cyrenensis opuscula , Rome, The kings were part of a tradition , usually hereditary, and had significant religious duties. A tyrant, on the other hand, came to power through secular political means, often by force, and they maintained their position by force, popularity, or both. Thus, "tyrant" did not originally mean a criminal; but the behavior of tyrants rapidly began to give the word the meaning it would have today, commiting crimes that often were also seen as offenses against religion; and philosophers like Plato analyzed the tyrant as possessing an immoral sort of personality type.

The difference between traditional kings and the tyrants was nicely expressed by Fustel de Coulanges: When the kings had been everywhere overthrown, and the aristocracy had become supreme, the people did not content themselves with regretting the monarchy; they aspired to restore it under a new form. In Greece, during the sixth century, they succeeded generally in procuring leaders; not wishing to call them kings, because this title implied the idea of religious functions, and could only be borne by sacerdotal families, they called them tyrants.

Hence comes the advice of Periander to Thrasybulus, his docking of the prominent cornstalks, meaning that the prominent citizens [ ] must always be made away with. Silently, walking through the fields outside Miletus with Periander's representative, Thryasybulus demonstrated his technique by cutting off the tops of the grainstalks that stood up higher than the others. Thus, anyone who might become a focus for opposition to a tyrant should be eliminated.

Aristotle has turned around who gave the advice to whom. Of course, it didn't much matter. Periander was also famous for murdering his wife and other crimes. Greek tyrants didn't always kill their opposition, both because exile was easy and effective, and in ancient religion one always worried about venegeful spirits causing trouble a motif familiar in Japanese history that recently has spawned novels and movies.

The most striking case may have involved Polycrates, the tyrant of Samos d. He had to deal with one of the most prominent citizens of Samos, and also one of the most prominent persons of the age, the philosopher Pythagoras. The result, of course, was that around Pythagoras fled, all the way to Croton in Italy.

There, his danger as a political leader was revealed when his followers took over the city and he became a tyrant himself. Since the Pythagorean community banned beans, Bertrand Russell joked that Pythagoras was soon overthrown because the masses hungered after beans. So Pythagoras had to flee again, to nearby Metapontum, where he lived out his life.

While tyrants were never called kings, we sometimes find people we would consider kings called tyrants. Why this is so may be evident from the story. Oedipus does not inherit the throne of Thebes but obtains it by passing the test of answering the riddle of the sphinx -- although he happens to be the one who killed the previous king, not realizing that this was actually his father.

Trouble continues as he unknowingly marries the king's widow, his own mother. The breaches of religion involved the blood pollution of murder, and incest soon resulted in ill fortune, sent by the gods, afflicting the city. Thus, in many ways Oedipus did not enjoy the sanction of religion as a ruler, making him more tyrant than king.

After the death of Alexander, his generals soon claimed kingship themselves, as the "Successors," , the Diadochi. This did not have the same religious sanction as traditional kings, but the precedent of Alexander himself created a new form of this, that the Hellenistic Kings are themselves gods. Note 9 Although very many ships were lost at sea in the pre-modern period, taking crew, cargo, and profit with them, the returns on a successful voyage could be astounding.

Roberts, Oxford, , p. The profit seems to have come largely from a single cargo of cloves. A key statement in the article runs thus: Coins stamped with images of animals or rulers, guaranteeing the metal's value, first appeared in the kingdom of Lydia, in what's now Turkey, around 2, years ago.

Soon after, cities and states in Greece, Persia, India and China began to strike their own coins. From the start, coins funded armies and wars of conquest. In the process, coins became legal tender for all sorts of transactions. Marketplaces were a result of the sytem, not its cause, revisionists argue.

Ionia , were traders, not conquerors, and their coins were not introduced to fund, and did not "from the start" fund, "armies and wars of conquest. And the Persian Empire , let alone earlier states, like Assyria , was created before this innovation had any chance to have an effect on its practices.

The coinage, for instance, of Darius , postdates the creation of the Empire by Cyrus and Cambyses , who were more or less contemporaneous with the introduction of coinage. So the expression above, "soon after," conceals the lack of actual connection, and the mismatched dates, between the two phenomena. So, indeed, markets came first, not state funding of armies and wars.

This is especially noteworthy with China , which has been incautiously included in the list of conquerors. Traditional China never used more than one kind of coin, the small brass "cash" coin with a square hole in the center. This was never worth much, and it was intentionally made that way, as a convenience, not for merchants or businesses, but for the daily, small transactions of ordinary people.

The cash coins were worth so little that later, when the Spanish silver dollar was introduced, it was rated as worth cash. This all was because Confucians did not trust merchants or businessmen, who were left to provide their own appropriate medium of exchange in silver ingots.

Gold was a state monopoly, precisely to fund "armies and wars of conquest," although Confucians actually didn't care much for those activities either, which left China relatively helpless in the face of conquest by Manchuria. And there never were gold coins, even when the Manchu Qing Dynasty began adopting Western coinage.

The hole in the coins was conveniently used to string together 50, , or whatever at a time. So, whether it is Mr. Bower or the "revisionists" -- with only David Graeber [ Debt: The First 5, Years , Melville House, ], actually given with a reference in the article -- they seem to be seriously out of their reckoning when it comes to the history of money, or even just history.

We might wonder why. Does David Graeber have some kind of agenda? Well, the "revisionists" seem to reject a basic principle of liberal democracy, which is that "governments are instituted among men to secure these rights," i. After all, when the Phoenicians landed on a distant shore and set about trading with the natives, they were operating in a State of Nature.

When markets were later governed by laws, this was to prevent the abuses that might occur in such situations, i. But if money derives from functions of state, and not from the natural conditions of markets, then the State has ontological priority. The "revisionists" may believe this because they are Hegelians and statists, for whom government and the state are more real than individuals, have natural authority over them, and which condescend to dispense rights to citizens, for its benefit, not for theirs.

This is the paradigm of leftist politics from the 20th century into the 21st. It is not clear from this one article if that is what is going on, but suspicion is warranted in the increasingly totalitarian modern academy. Note 11 Some people like to think that the wealth of Athens derived from the Laurion silver mines.

But this is to make a fundamental mistake about the nature of wealth -- an instance of " Cargo Cult " economics. Money is worthless without something to buy. Even gold, without commerce, may as well be used, as the Egyptians did, to make or cover coffins. If goods are produced, then it doesn't matter who has the gold or silver, it will run, like water, to the producers.

A prime example of that is the great flood of metal from the silver mines of Mexico and Peru, starting in the 16th century, which all went to Spain. Since Spain was not a commercial or manufacturing power, it simply spent the money. That helped make it a predominant power for over a century, but the money, when spent, then went to the commercial states, like the Netherlands and England.

The Netherlands , small as it was, then demonstrated a new order of economic strength by successfully revolting against Spain. All that all of the silver had done to the Spanish economy was to produce a raging inflation -- always the result of too much money chasing too few goods.

Athens suffered no such embarrassments. It could absorb its own silver, and much, much more, like the "tribute" from the League of Delos , because of the strength of its own economy. Note 12 This is rather like when the "Psychic Friends Network," which dispensed paranormal advice by phone, filed for bankruptcy early in , the news stories asked "Didn't they see it coming?

Note 13 The Greek historian of philosophy Diogenes Laertius, refers to a lost work, that of Hieronymus of Rhodes, crediting Thales with "measuring the pyramids by their shadow, having observed the time when our own shadow is equal to our height" G. Raven, The Presocratic Philosophers , Cambridge, , p. This would be a little awkward, since one's own height would have to be ascertained and the shadow measured by it.

Since the gnomon -- a stick in the ground -- was in use at the time to observe the path of the sun, using one would be considerably easier and just as simple. Note 14 The virtue of cuneiform writing, incised on clay tablets, which otherwise would seem messy and cumbersome, is that it will not decay or burn. When the Assyrian cities were burned and looted c.

Egyptian papyrus, although far more convenient as a writing material, decays and burns easily, leaving us with a pitiful fragment of Egyptian literature. Surviving papyri are largely from tombs in the desert, preserved by the dry conditions; but Egyptian libraries were not built in the desert. Much Egyptian literature, indeed, has not survived on papyrus at all but on the ostraca , the fragments of pots and chips of stone, that were used by boys no girls, by the way in scribal schools -- they were denied valuable papyrus for the humble task of copying their lessons.

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Triple Treat. Note 12 This is rather like when the "Psychic Friends Network," which dispensed paranormal advice by phone, filed for bankruptcy early in , the news stories asked "Didn't they see it coming? Phoinix is a Third Declension noun, and we must analyze it as Phoinik-s , in the nominative, as it is Phoinik-os in the genitive. Note 15 Kissinger should have known better than to have so underestimated the strength of America, since he certainly would have known how Napoleon had foolishly dismissed England as "a nation of shopkeepers" -- where the shopkeepers built a navy that sank Napoleon's, and then carried him to exile on St.


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